Have you ever taken a bottle of water out of the refrigerator and put it on the table?

Have you ever taken a bottle of water out of the refrigerator and put it on the table? Did you see what happened?
Condensation formed and made a puddle on the table. This happens to your cargo, with terrible consequences.

In fact, every year more than 150 million shipping containers are transported all over the world. They are at risk of damage from moisture and humidity, and 20% of these containers show moisture problems on arrival.
When cargo is transported between varying climates, condensation occurs which destroys your valuable cargo.

Does this affect you ? Then give us a call at 02-707 9884 and let us help you.

9413588 mug of beer with froth behind an open half filled brown bottle of beer both showing condensation and Have you ever taken a bottle of water out of the refrigerator and put it on the table?

 

No more condensation.

By absorbing excess moisture in the air, it prevents the relative humidity from reaching dew point, thus preventing condensation. Nordic Power Desiccants are designed to absorb more than 200% its weight.

Our desiccants are packed in special Tyvek® and Spunbond packing that allows only one way absorption, thus ensuring the desiccants are completely leak proof and efficient. Nordic Power Desiccants are environmentally friendly.
With twice as much absorption than other desiccants you use fewer units, which means more savings for every container you ship.

We Protect:

Agriculture – Coffee, Tea, Cocoa, Rice, Copra, Vegetables, Fruit, Tobacco, etc.
Wood Products – Paper, Furniture, Timber, etc.
Leather – Footwear, Garments, furniture, etc.
Metals – Sheets, Coils, Machinery, etc.
Electronics – Appliances, Cables, Toys, Computers, etc.
Textiles – Garments, Fabrics, etc.
Latex products – gloves etc.
Fewer units, less space, more savings

Less is more

Higher absorption means you can use fewer units than other desiccants, and with its compact design, Nordic saves you valuable loading space, all which translates into more savings for every container you use.

 

 

 Have you ever taken a bottle of water out of the refrigerator and put it on the table?

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InterDry Power Desiccant – Weight gain by absorption

We have been testing and tweaking our products for many years. I would like to have a look at one of those tests that we participated in together with 4 of our main competitors.

Below is the result of a test where the weight gain by absorption was calculated by a temperature of 38 degrees Celcius, 90% Relative Humidity, during a period of one month. Calculations were made by re-calibrating the initial weight to 1000 grams uniformly amongst all different brands of desiccant so that direct comparison was possible.

XIOS Limburg Nordic Power Desiccant large1 1024x630 InterDry Power Desiccant   Weight gain by absorption

All products showed initially a very high absorption in the first 7 days. Our competitors dropped out very quickly as you can see. Other Brand 2 started losing its absorption power after 5 days and even started leaking after 7 days. Other Brand 3 and Other Brand 6 started leaking on day 11.

Can you imagine what happens to your cargo if in the first week there is no protection from humidity inside your container?

InterDry Power Desiccant 1000 grams went on to absorb moisture resulting in a final weight of approximately 2800 grams.


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Ocean Container Temperature and Humidity Study

By: Pakarada Premtitikul
General Manager
InterDry (Thailand) Co., Ltd.

A study on a few typical shipments and the effect on Temperature and Relative Humidity.

Let’s have a look at three commonly used shipping routes and what this does to the temperature and humidity inside the shipping container.

We’ve chosen three routes, namely Japan – Netherlands, Japan – Memphis and Japan – Portland.

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Typical Conditions

A normal shipment consists of three distinct stages. The first stage includes the time from container filling until the container is loaded onto a ship. This includes road transportation and brief periods of storage. Daily cycles of temperature and humidity are common. For example, figure 2 includes temperature swings of 40° F [22°C] during the first stage of a shipment from Japan to The Netherlands.

The second stage is the actual time at sea or aboard a ship. This may or may not be the longest stage during the container’s journey. During this stage, daily cycles of temperature and humidity are usually very minor or completely non-existent. Temperature changes are gradual, often occurring over days rather than hours. Occasionally, a single temperature/ humidity cycle occurs as the ship makes stops along the route, however extreme conditions are rare. Figure 3 includes a slow temperature rise and fall as a winter route takes the ship near the equator and then north to The Netherlands.

The final stage begins when the container is removed from the ship and continues until the recorder is removed during the freight unloading process. This may include varying periods of time spent in customs, on trains, on trucks, and in storage. Daily temperature and humidity cycles are common and may be extreme.

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Typical summer shipment – Japan to the Netherlands

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Typical winter shipment – Japan to the Netherlands

 

Extreme Conditions:

Some of the most interesting recordings are the extreme conditions. The highest recorded temperature occurred on July 25, 2005 during a shipment from Japan to Memphis. The temperature reached 135° F [57° C] during the third stage of this shipment (figure 7).

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Hottest shipment 135°F (57°C) – Japan to Memphis (USA).

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Coldest shipment -21°F (-29° C) – Japan to Memphis (USA).

The lowest recorded temperature occurred on January 15, 2005 also along the Japan to Memphis route (figure 8). The temperature dropped to -21° F [-29° C], which is slightly beyond the recorder’s published temperature range.

The shipment with the highest relative humidity occurred during a trip from Japan to Portland. The relative humidity was recorded at 96% on August 5, 2005 while the container was on land. Figure 6 shows the detailed temperature and humidity profile. The most extreme humidity conditions are seen during periods of large daily temperature changes. In this example, as the temperature slowly drops from 88° F [31° C] to 67° F [19° C] over 9 days, the humidity increases to 88% before returning to 79%. However, starting on August 4 as the temperature dropped from 121° F [49° C] to 68° F [20° C] over a 16 hour period, the relative humidity rose from 32% to 96%. The corrugated boxes seem to absorb moisture fast enough to temper humidity during slow changes in temperature while at sea. However, rapid temperature changes seen on land seem to exceed the rate at which the corrugated boxes can absorb moisture.

clip image006 thumb Ocean Container Temperature and Humidity Study

Highest relative humidity 96% – Japan to Portland (USA).

 

 Ocean Container Temperature and Humidity Study

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